Medical experts say the best way to beat a tumour is to get it out of the way before it becomes a major problem.

Dr Gopinath Mishra, a cardiologist from Delhi’s BK Medical College, said the key was to avoid “fatalities of the eye, heart, kidneys, liver and other organs.”

Dr Mishra said the best approach was to treat the tumour with a treatment that has already been tested and approved by the Indian and American medical communities.

“If we don’t know how to do this, we have no chance of getting a positive result in any patient,” he said.

In a study published in the Lancet on Thursday, Dr Mishra’s team compared the results of a group of 40 patients with similar cancers and their treatment plans with those of patients who were given a placebo.

After a month of treatment, all of the tumours were cleared, the team found.

This is a great result, but it is not enough.

It should be followed up with additional tests, more radiation, chemotherapy and even stem cell transplantation.

Dr Mish, a specialist in cardiovascular disease and pulmonary diseases, said a similar study of cancer patients in the UK showed that the patients who received chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplants showed no evidence of recurrence after a year.

“It was clear that this was not an effective treatment,” he added.

“It was an excellent result for the cancer patients, but not for the rest of us.”

The key to success is to have the right dose, frequency and duration of treatment.

“Dr Gopal Singh, a doctor in the Department of Oncology and Cancer at the Tata Memorial Institute, said if the treatment was given every few months, the odds of recurrences were low.

But if the tumor has become aggressive, such as in a case of breast cancer, there is a risk that chemotherapy may not be effective.

Dr Singh said the results were encouraging and could help inform more about the cancer treatment and to tailor treatment to the tumorous location.”

For example, the tumur has a different molecular structure and different chemistry, and this can affect the response of the body. “

There are many reasons for this.

For example, the tumur has a different molecular structure and different chemistry, and this can affect the response of the body.

Another reason for aggressive tumours is that they can be caused by mutations in the genes that regulate how the body processes and processes hormones.”

Dr Singh, who was not involved in the study, said this would likely mean the results could be used to design more effective therapies for more aggressive tumour cells.

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